salemexplainsitall:

It was 30 years ago today that the Breakfast Club met for detention 

There is no Shermer in Illinoise. Fucking movie was bullshit, man.

(Reblogged from pockmarkedmoon)

thefusspot:

Sometimes, I have good sketch days.

Today was not one of those days.

If this is your bad day, please let me know about your good days.

(Reblogged from thefusspot)

thefusspot:

I only have a few minutes before I have to get my arse to work, but I wanted to put a little blurb up here to announce the Beta of Emerald Kingdom.

Now, there might not be a whole lot to do in there right now, but from a developer side, this is the culmination of all of the free time that several of us have been able to scrounge together over the last three or so years.  It’s been a hell of a ride thus far, and we’ve still got a long way to go.  But I Consider the fact that none of us have made games before, but we were somehow able to put together a client that people can log into, in which they can walk around to talk to others, and I’m pretty flippin’ excited.

We made an announcement on Facebook with more details about the Beta and how you can sign up.  Or you can go directly to V-Shift and register there to participate in the forums and see what all is going on.

That aside, I’m sorry I haven’t been posting much here.  Between game work, commission work and work at the store, I haven’t really had enough brain cells to make something worth putting up here.  Hopefully that will change in the coming days as I do more EK-related work that can be posted here.

Thanks for your time!

(Reblogged from thefusspot)
(Reblogged from pockmarkedmoon)

thumbcramps:

hi guys! this is a comic i made for a final in my comics in literature class. we had to do a research paper on a topic we’d discussed in class and then accompany it with a comic with a relevant subject. my paper was about hyper-sexualization of women in comic books, but i decided to broaden it out here as well as personalize it and make myself the subject and discuss something i’ve been subjected to in the convention circuit and on the internet as well as thousands of other women, as well as give a cue to thought about how the comic book industry as well as the video game industry and even just media in general (all of which are male dominated) push such ridiculous pressures onto girls and women.

also, it feels kind of silly to have to add this since i hope it’s obvious, but i am very aware that there are men that don’t subscribe to this attitude, and am incredibly grateful that these issues are brought to light to people other than the ones that are subjected to it. 

anyway haha i have literally been staring at this for 9 hours i don’t even know which direction is up anymore. thanks for reading!!!

I would add that it seems like the people who do this learned social behavior from their oppressors. Like the monkeys that get bowled over by larger monkeys and then do the same thing to smaller monkeys. And we laugh at the monkeys because we don’t see it in ourselves.

I also avoid having geeky conversations. I avoid geeky conferences. I avoid having a strong opinion about anything. I don’t wear clothing that has opinions. I don’t wear tattoos and will never. I especially avoid opinions on music, so much so that I tend to not listen to music (music geeks are crazy). I try to avoid mentioning that I’ve read the books others have read, seen the movies that others have seen, especially if my opinion of these things differ. All because people are assholes.

(Reblogged from thumbcramps)
pockmarkedmoon:

cutetimmytim:

dimensionsintime:

annespage:

mutantbakabutt:

foreverisreal:

blunts-and-robots:

devils-in-my-head:



this this this this this

if anyone hates me for this you’re not thinking clearly
think about the amount of people killed in the middle east, too ..

lol so edgy xD

the only reason america dropped the atomic bomb was because we were at WAR idiots, if we hadn’t dropped the bomb the war would’ve lasted at lot longer. 9/11 was an act of terrorism, why don’t you go watch a video of the twin towers as they burn after the planes crash into them and later collapse in on themselves burying not only the people that worked there inside, but also the police officers and firefighters who were trying to rescue any survivors, and before they collapsed, when people were forced to choose to burn or jump out to their deaths. so yeah, the atomic bomb killed more people, but one was during WWII and the other was a direct attack of terrorism on America. And the only reason we were at war with Japan was because they attacked us at pearl harbor, if they hadn’t done that the war would’ve stayed in Europe and the atomic bomb wouldn’t have been dropped.

Not even remotely true, but thanks for playing. This misconception largely occurs because of the famous Stimson article that was featured in Harpers’ magazine.
Of course, he didn’t actually WRITE the thing and, though it presents itself as a fireside chat between two people it was actually a heavily engineered document, and almost every fact cited was knowingly wrong by the government at the time (declassified documents - read ‘em). But hey! What better source for info!
That’s neither here nor there though since Japan tried to surrender before we dropped the bomb.
Several Times.
Yes, Japan tried to surrender. Once through Russia, once through Switzerland, once through the Vatican of all places, and many times appealing directly to Truman. We turned them down because of the stipulation that we were not allowed to touch their emperor, a concession the US was not willing to make at the time.

“Foreign Minister Shigemitsu has instructed Ambassador Sato [in Moscow] to find out whether Russia is willing to assist in bringing about a negotiated peace. Shigemitsu’s instructions, although cautiously worded, clearly imply that he has in mind a move by Russia to initiate peace discussions between Japan and the Anglo-Americans… [I]t seems hardly likely that he would have taken such a step without having consulted at least some of the more important members of the new Japanese cabinet… This is the first time that the Japanese have been willing to suggest to Russia directly that they are ready for peace.”
-“Japanese Consider Peace Possibilities” War Department MAGIC reports of intercepted messages: EYES ONLY for President and closest advisers
“I learn from a very reliable source that in important civilian circles in Japan the peace problem is being discussed with increasing anxiety. A speedy German collapse is expected and it is not believed that Japan can then continue the war. It is therefore considered necessary to get peace as soon as possible before the country and towns are destroyed… If any willingness appeared to exist in London the Japanese would be ready for preliminary discussions through Swedish channels. Behind the man who gave me this message stands one of the best known statesment in Japan and there is no doubt that this attempt must be considered as a serious one.”
-Telegram from Swedish minister in Tokyo given from the British Ambassador to the United States
“…It seems probably that very far-reaching conditions would be accepted by the Japanese by way of negotiation… Exchange of the Japanese constituted must also be considered as excluded. The Emperor must not be touched. However, the Imperial power could be somewhat democratized as is that of the English King”
-Report from Swedish minister in Tokyo sent to US State Department
AND EVEN LATER THEY GAVE THOSE CONDITIONS UP
“…Stated that he had been asked by Masutaro Inoue, Counsellor for the Japanese Legation in Portugal, to contact United States representatives. Source quoted Inoue as saying that the Japanese are ready to cease hostilities, provided they are allowed to retain possession of their home islands… On 19 May [1945], the OSS representative reported Inoue again had repeated to source his desire to talk with an American representative. On this occasion Inoue declared that actual peace terms were unimportant so long as the term ‘unconditional surrender’ was not employed.”
-OSS Representative report directly to Truman

Of course, we did anyway. But that’s not important.
Because the bomb wasn’t about Japan.
In Derry and Ramsey’s Memo to Groves (May 12, 1945) when picking a target for the atomic bomb, one of the primary listed reasons for picking a target was:

“making the initial use sufficiently spectacular for the importance of the weapon to be internationally recognized when publicity on it is released.”

In fact, they ranked targets - AA to B. Know what got the lowest ratings? Military targets. The ones that got the highest ratings were civilian ones.
Japan was currently researching wooden planes. WOODEN PLANES. They had attempted to give up, we said no. They had already lost the war when we dropped the bomb. They knew this - hell, they tried to surrender twice.
So why did we drop the bomb, then?
A close reading of the memo tells all. It was to make an impact on the international community.
Do you know how Truman was first informed about the Manhatten Project and the bomb? It was in a discussion with the Secretary of State in regards to negotiations with Russia after the war.
Truman kept delaying the “Big Three” discussions, the most important political talks in recorded history, until basically the day AFTER the Trinity Tests - he wanted to wait until he knew he had the bomb as a political piece. Stalin and Churchill were VERY angry at him pushing the date back with little to no reason given (they knew, of course, because of spies and intelligence).
Still don’t believe me?
The Secretary of War, and MOST of the army was against dropping the bomb. They wanted to give the option of doing a demonstration and giving Japan an option of total surrender (that we get to do whatever we want with the Emperor) or of giving Japan time to evacuate the civilian population before bombing a city.
Oh, and there’s this from Stimson’s Memo of Talk with Truman (June 6, 1945)

“I told [the President] that I was anxious about this feature of the war for two reasons: first, because I did not want to have the United States get the reputation of outdoing Hitler in atrocities; and second, I was a little fearful that before we could get ready the Air Force might have Japan so thoroughly bombed out that the new weapon would not have a fair background to show its strength. He laughed and said he understood.”

He laughed.
An estimated 500,000 people died between Nagasaki and Hiroshima if you count deaths by radiation poisoning and long-term cancer.
And Truman could only laugh because he was worried the bomb might not be noticeable amongst the wreckage of Japan.
The reason for dropping the bomb was to give America a better condition amongst the international population, particularly Stalin and Russia, in the coming years. It was to make Russia afraid to invade Japan (and from there, the fear was, the rest of Asia) when they knew America had interests in it. They dropped the bomb to give them an advantage when negotiating in the future and to give them a start when everyone began arming (a situation tons of scientists warned everyone about in The Franck Report).
But don’t pretend it was about Japan. And don’t you dare pretend it was about peace.
500,000 people died and all Truman could do was laugh.

I’m rebloggjng this because of the fullness of the information-rich response (the part that actually contains facts, not the rah rah America one)


Jesus. Honestly, I didn’t know. The things you learn.

Even with all that information, the story is incomplete at best (as is all history, really, with each major event requiring the full context of the event preceding it, and so on and so forth).

You’ll note that in every peace offering the Japanese tried, they required conditions. As quoted above, at first they required that they keep their Emperor, the symbol of their empire, descendent of the gods, and the one who personally approved some of his own morally-dubious tactics in the invasion of China and during World War 2.

They tried surrendering to the Russians because they thought the Russians would offer better terms. Russia got bloodied pretty badly and just wanted the whole thing to be over, and didn’t start threatening Japan until after the bombs were dropped, which some say was the deciding factor that caused the Japanese to surrender. Even after Nagasaki, they were going to keep fighting, and the US had no atomic bombs left.

The later move towards “we surrender everything as long as you don’t say we surrender everything,” was still a condition. To save face, the regime wanted to be able to spin something other than total defeat (and reading the speech the Emperor gave, that is exactly what they did).

I’m not going to start comparing atrocities. Nobody wins, and all those people are still dead. The atomic bomb is debatably the greatest atrocity mankind has ever unleashed upon itself, but even without it we are still pretty fucking good at atrocious behavior.

But you can pick your quotes and make arguments for just about any point fit the subset of facts you choose. Just look at the Holocaust deniers, or whatever religious argument is in the news this week.

pockmarkedmoon:

cutetimmytim:

dimensionsintime:

annespage:

mutantbakabutt:

foreverisreal:

blunts-and-robots:

devils-in-my-head:

image

this this this this this

if anyone hates me for this you’re not thinking clearly

think about the amount of people killed in the middle east, too ..

lol so edgy xD

the only reason america dropped the atomic bomb was because we were at WAR idiots, if we hadn’t dropped the bomb the war would’ve lasted at lot longer. 9/11 was an act of terrorism, why don’t you go watch a video of the twin towers as they burn after the planes crash into them and later collapse in on themselves burying not only the people that worked there inside, but also the police officers and firefighters who were trying to rescue any survivors, and before they collapsed, when people were forced to choose to burn or jump out to their deaths. so yeah, the atomic bomb killed more people, but one was during WWII and the other was a direct attack of terrorism on America. And the only reason we were at war with Japan was because they attacked us at pearl harbor, if they hadn’t done that the war would’ve stayed in Europe and the atomic bomb wouldn’t have been dropped.

Not even remotely true, but thanks for playing. This misconception largely occurs because of the famous Stimson article that was featured in Harpers’ magazine.

Of course, he didn’t actually WRITE the thing and, though it presents itself as a fireside chat between two people it was actually a heavily engineered document, and almost every fact cited was knowingly wrong by the government at the time (declassified documents - read ‘em). But hey! What better source for info!

That’s neither here nor there though since Japan tried to surrender before we dropped the bomb.

Several Times.

Yes, Japan tried to surrender. Once through Russia, once through Switzerland, once through the Vatican of all places, and many times appealing directly to Truman. We turned them down because of the stipulation that we were not allowed to touch their emperor, a concession the US was not willing to make at the time.

“Foreign Minister Shigemitsu has instructed Ambassador Sato [in Moscow] to find out whether Russia is willing to assist in bringing about a negotiated peace. Shigemitsu’s instructions, although cautiously worded, clearly imply that he has in mind a move by Russia to initiate peace discussions between Japan and the Anglo-Americans… [I]t seems hardly likely that he would have taken such a step without having consulted at least some of the more important members of the new Japanese cabinet… This is the first time that the Japanese have been willing to suggest to Russia directly that they are ready for peace.”

-“Japanese Consider Peace Possibilities” War Department MAGIC reports of intercepted messages: EYES ONLY for President and closest advisers

“I learn from a very reliable source that in important civilian circles in Japan the peace problem is being discussed with increasing anxiety. A speedy German collapse is expected and it is not believed that Japan can then continue the war. It is therefore considered necessary to get peace as soon as possible before the country and towns are destroyed… If any willingness appeared to exist in London the Japanese would be ready for preliminary discussions through Swedish channels. Behind the man who gave me this message stands one of the best known statesment in Japan and there is no doubt that this attempt must be considered as a serious one.”

-Telegram from Swedish minister in Tokyo given from the British Ambassador to the United States

“…It seems probably that very far-reaching conditions would be accepted by the Japanese by way of negotiation… Exchange of the Japanese constituted must also be considered as excluded. The Emperor must not be touched. However, the Imperial power could be somewhat democratized as is that of the English King”

-Report from Swedish minister in Tokyo sent to US State Department

AND EVEN LATER THEY GAVE THOSE CONDITIONS UP

“…Stated that he had been asked by Masutaro Inoue, Counsellor for the Japanese Legation in Portugal, to contact United States representatives. Source quoted Inoue as saying that the Japanese are ready to cease hostilities, provided they are allowed to retain possession of their home islands… On 19 May [1945], the OSS representative reported Inoue again had repeated to source his desire to talk with an American representative. On this occasion Inoue declared that actual peace terms were unimportant so long as the term ‘unconditional surrender’ was not employed.”

-OSS Representative report directly to Truman

Of course, we did anyway. But that’s not important.

Because the bomb wasn’t about Japan.

In Derry and Ramsey’s Memo to Groves (May 12, 1945) when picking a target for the atomic bomb, one of the primary listed reasons for picking a target was:

“making the initial use sufficiently spectacular for the importance of the weapon to be internationally recognized when publicity on it is released.”

In fact, they ranked targets - AA to B. Know what got the lowest ratings? Military targets. The ones that got the highest ratings were civilian ones.

Japan was currently researching wooden planes. WOODEN PLANES. They had attempted to give up, we said no. They had already lost the war when we dropped the bomb. They knew this - hell, they tried to surrender twice.

So why did we drop the bomb, then?

A close reading of the memo tells all. It was to make an impact on the international community.

Do you know how Truman was first informed about the Manhatten Project and the bomb? It was in a discussion with the Secretary of State in regards to negotiations with Russia after the war.

Truman kept delaying the “Big Three” discussions, the most important political talks in recorded history, until basically the day AFTER the Trinity Tests - he wanted to wait until he knew he had the bomb as a political piece. Stalin and Churchill were VERY angry at him pushing the date back with little to no reason given (they knew, of course, because of spies and intelligence).

Still don’t believe me?

The Secretary of War, and MOST of the army was against dropping the bomb. They wanted to give the option of doing a demonstration and giving Japan an option of total surrender (that we get to do whatever we want with the Emperor) or of giving Japan time to evacuate the civilian population before bombing a city.

Oh, and there’s this from Stimson’s Memo of Talk with Truman (June 6, 1945)

“I told [the President] that I was anxious about this feature of the war for two reasons: first, because I did not want to have the United States get the reputation of outdoing Hitler in atrocities; and second, I was a little fearful that before we could get ready the Air Force might have Japan so thoroughly bombed out that the new weapon would not have a fair background to show its strength. He laughed and said he understood.”

He laughed.

An estimated 500,000 people died between Nagasaki and Hiroshima if you count deaths by radiation poisoning and long-term cancer.

And Truman could only laugh because he was worried the bomb might not be noticeable amongst the wreckage of Japan.

The reason for dropping the bomb was to give America a better condition amongst the international population, particularly Stalin and Russia, in the coming years. It was to make Russia afraid to invade Japan (and from there, the fear was, the rest of Asia) when they knew America had interests in it. They dropped the bomb to give them an advantage when negotiating in the future and to give them a start when everyone began arming (a situation tons of scientists warned everyone about in The Franck Report).

But don’t pretend it was about Japan. And don’t you dare pretend it was about peace.

500,000 people died and all Truman could do was laugh.

I’m rebloggjng this because of the fullness of the information-rich response (the part that actually contains facts, not the rah rah America one)

Jesus. Honestly, I didn’t know. The things you learn.

Even with all that information, the story is incomplete at best (as is all history, really, with each major event requiring the full context of the event preceding it, and so on and so forth).

You’ll note that in every peace offering the Japanese tried, they required conditions. As quoted above, at first they required that they keep their Emperor, the symbol of their empire, descendent of the gods, and the one who personally approved some of his own morally-dubious tactics in the invasion of China and during World War 2.

They tried surrendering to the Russians because they thought the Russians would offer better terms. Russia got bloodied pretty badly and just wanted the whole thing to be over, and didn’t start threatening Japan until after the bombs were dropped, which some say was the deciding factor that caused the Japanese to surrender. Even after Nagasaki, they were going to keep fighting, and the US had no atomic bombs left.

The later move towards “we surrender everything as long as you don’t say we surrender everything,” was still a condition. To save face, the regime wanted to be able to spin something other than total defeat (and reading the speech the Emperor gave, that is exactly what they did).

I’m not going to start comparing atrocities. Nobody wins, and all those people are still dead. The atomic bomb is debatably the greatest atrocity mankind has ever unleashed upon itself, but even without it we are still pretty fucking good at atrocious behavior.

But you can pick your quotes and make arguments for just about any point fit the subset of facts you choose. Just look at the Holocaust deniers, or whatever religious argument is in the news this week.

(Reblogged from pockmarkedmoon)

thefusspot:

The following is an interpretation of this character (whom I had named ‘Alanis’) written by a friend.  I found it to be a good read. :)

preaction:

thefusspot:

The first page in my new sketchbook, and the finished version of one of the last ones I posted.

If I were to do a comic I’d ideally want to do it in color, but I can’t do that and do it quickly, I don’t think.  So I’m trying to get used to Manga Studio.

I dunno.  Either way, you can see where I ditched ballpoint in favor of pencil/Copic Multiliner.  Ballpoints are pretty decent for technical concept work, but I prefer pencils for people, I guess.

If you don’t mind terribly much: A story of her. Well, more of a character description than anything, I guess.

Stephanie was a loner. It wasn’t that she despised company, nor was it that the people around her disliked her. She wasn’t the warmest person, her innocence and light had been tormented out of her by cruel classmates by the time she was 6. But, neither was she off-putting, she was helpful and courteous to everyone who knew her.

She defied the traditional awkward teenager stereotype with a quiet stoicism. She was not thin, but she was slightly taller than average, both of which won her no favors growing up. Her green eyes shined like emeralds, but her hair stayed unruly (though whether through apathy or poor fortune was unclear). Her face was plain and unremarkable, and though she was well on her way to womanhood, she never wore makeup. There were times, in her heavy winter coat, she was mistaken for a boy, but that never really bothered her.

Stephanie’s father was a scholar. They had moved to the Territories just three years ago, when Stephanie was 13, for her father’s studies. He was always “her father”, never “daddy” or even “dad.” He wasn’t distant, but he wasn’t warm. He was always caught up in thought. He had a way of drifting through the house as if in trance, stopping sometimes to stare through window and wall alike. Perhaps she got her demeanor from him.

Her mother died when she was 3, and all she had left was a faded memory and a cheap keepsake necklace. Father rarely talked about her except in the most reverent of tones. She was tall and graceful. An angel of fire. His shelter and his muse. After a while he would trail off and stare at his desk for hours, unmoving as the dead.

Stephanie lived in Toronto until they moved out here. Her life in Toronto was anything but idyllic. With her father’s work for the College, she had a lot of time to herself. Unfortunately for her, the children at school did not let her keep to herself. They called her “Hefty”, or “Steph-ty” when the teachers were like to overhear, and would torment her mercilessly.

On the few occasions when they took it too far and she fought back, sobbing and screaming to be left alone, inevitably she was fingered as the aggressor. She was tall even then, and after she failed to convince the teachers that they had all ganged up on her, she simply stopped arguing. She never stopped fighting, though, which got her into plenty enough trouble.

Thankfully, Toronto was three years behind her now. The teens at her new school were not cruel, but after the novelty of the new kid had worn off, they went their way and she went hers. She didn’t blame them, in a small school where everybody had grown up together it can be hard to accept someone new and strange as a friend. Most days she preferred being on her own anyway.

With her father mostly occupied, and with her propensity for solitude, Steph had plenty of time to explore the place they had made their new home. The Northwest Territories were known to the natives as “beautiful land”. It was rarely warm, nowhere near as warm as Toronto had been, but Fort Smith was surrounded by forests. Any spare time she could, she spent in the forests, exploring the great woods, watching the animals, looking for interesting things.

It was a sunny day in early spring when she happened upon the burrow. It had been dug into a gentle hill, so the cave sloped sharply downward. Truthfully, she fell into it, her left foot firmly planted on the ground next to opening, her right foot finding only air. She landed across the opening, bruising her shoulder in the fall.

Once she brushed herself off, rubbing her shoulder, she peered deep into the cave. The sun didn’t penetrate very far, but the longer she stared, the brighter the burrow seemed to get. Eventually, she noticed a faint blue light emanating from somewhere far into the cave. In the glow, the burrow became a cavern, larger than her room at home. It was the blue glow that made her crawl into the burrow, and leave the world behind her.

I seem to have neglected the paragraph that explains her affinity to sports (Hockey and Rugby specifically, she’s a tough, strong girl), opposite her father’s scholarly pursuits (which explains her hockey stick, and her skill at wielding it in the future).

Spoiler alert: When she returns from the cave, the world seems faded, desaturated. She seems invisible to the normal world, but very visible to the new array of animals and monsters that find her. A helpful denizen calls it “in-between”, we might call it “a parallel universe”, 90 degrees from the reality we know. They bleed together, though nobody in the “real” world notices.

Someone has to steal that keepsake necklace. She also has to save somebody and be a hero. She makes some lifelong friends. The whole spiel.

She seems like she’d have a dog too, a white husky. Or maybe she meets a bear in-between. Or an Alaska Marmot (something unique would be nice, though it exists nowhere near Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, Canada). I like the idea of a marmot, ferret, or mongoose, the long, elegant rodents. He would be a stark contrast to her stoicism, full of energy and vibrance (almost to the point of ADD).

It might be her mother disappeared to in-between (or maybe just her spirit). There’s also a Reaper, a thin wisp of blackness 12 feet tall, but Death in the neutral sense, not in the evil sense. He never speaks, though she might talk at him, even scream at him, blame him for her mother (think No-Face, but without animosity or antagonism).

I would avoid the standard “she finds her femininity” or “turns into a princess” tropes because really. I mean really. Gag me with a Volkswagen. I hate the “princess” trope most of all. As far as I can tell, the only true reward because of her journey will be confidence, companionship, some closure for her mother, and maybe a battle scar or two. A real-life happy ending if ever there was one, in contrast to the fantasy world her story takes place in.

Video game or short story, whatever. I think it’d be awesome to watch her wielding her hockey stick to bludgeon enemies, and her marmot darting from enemy to enemy in a blur of motion.

Ah… the stories that art can evoke.

There are a few differences between this and the back story I’ve been cooking up, but overall, this is eerily close to what I’ve been considering.  I guess this means I have to take a crack at writing my own character next. :)

Thanks for taking the time to write this, man.  I never figured anyone would give her this much thought outside of me.

It had to be done. She looks like a hero on the second page, the upper- and lower-right there, and heroes need legends written about them.

Plus, as you can tell, I need to practice story-telling :p. I tend to be direct, no bullshit, targeted, straight-to-the-point, mechanical even, and that doesn’t make for an interesting story. I kept having to go back and add more description, fill in areas, and I still see that it’s incredibly brief, sparse almost. A story is a picture with words, so you’ve got to have thousands of them! (and it can be a lot easier when you start with the picture). That much exposition alone could probably cover pages and pages (and so should be broken up, lots of potential for flashbacks / dream sequences, especially in a fantasy realm).

If I had noticed the bit where you said “comic”, I’d’ve tried my hand at a script-style piece (less exposition, more action). Never done one of them before, though I did write 6-10 4-panel comic strips a long, long time ago (artist and I had a disagreement about “daily newspaper style” or “full-page manga style” after the first comic, and that was that).

(Reblogged from thefusspot)

thefusspot:

The first page in my new sketchbook, and the finished version of one of the last ones I posted.

If I were to do a comic I’d ideally want to do it in color, but I can’t do that and do it quickly, I don’t think.  So I’m trying to get used to Manga Studio.

I dunno.  Either way, you can see where I ditched ballpoint in favor of pencil/Copic Multiliner.  Ballpoints are pretty decent for technical concept work, but I prefer pencils for people, I guess.

If you don’t mind terribly much: A story of her. Well, more of a character description than anything, I guess.

Stephanie was a loner. It wasn’t that she despised company, nor was it that the people around her disliked her. She wasn’t the warmest person, her innocence and light had been tormented out of her by cruel classmates by the time she was 6. But, neither was she off-putting, she was helpful and courteous to everyone who knew her.

She defied the traditional awkward teenager stereotype with a quiet stoicism. She was not thin, but she was slightly taller than average, both of which won her no favors growing up. Her green eyes shined like emeralds, but her hair stayed unruly (though whether through apathy or poor fortune was unclear). Her face was plain and unremarkable, and though she was well on her way to womanhood, she never wore makeup. There were times, in her heavy winter coat, she was mistaken for a boy, but that never really bothered her.

Stephanie’s father was a scholar. They had moved to the Territories just three years ago, when Stephanie was 13, for her father’s studies. He was always “her father”, never “daddy” or even “dad.” He wasn’t distant, but he wasn’t warm. He was always caught up in thought. He had a way of drifting through the house as if in trance, stopping sometimes to stare through window and wall alike. Perhaps she got her demeanor from him.

Her mother died when she was 3, and all she had left was a faded memory and a cheap keepsake necklace. Father rarely talked about her except in the most reverent of tones. She was tall and graceful. An angel of fire. His shelter and his muse. After a while he would trail off and stare at his desk for hours, unmoving as the dead.

Stephanie lived in Toronto until they moved out here. Her life in Toronto was anything but idyllic. With her father’s work for the College, she had a lot of time to herself. Unfortunately for her, the children at school did not let her keep to herself. They called her “Hefty”, or “Steph-ty” when the teachers were like to overhear, and would torment her mercilessly.

On the few occasions when they took it too far and she fought back, sobbing and screaming to be left alone, inevitably she was fingered as the aggressor. She was tall even then, and after she failed to convince the teachers that they had all ganged up on her, she simply stopped arguing. She never stopped fighting, though, which got her into plenty enough trouble.

Thankfully, Toronto was three years behind her now. The teens at her new school were not cruel, but after the novelty of the new kid had worn off, they went their way and she went hers. She didn’t blame them, in a small school where everybody had grown up together it can be hard to accept someone new and strange as a friend. Most days she preferred being on her own anyway.

With her father mostly occupied, and with her propensity for solitude, Steph had plenty of time to explore the place they had made their new home. The Northwest Territories were known to the natives as “beautiful land”. It was rarely warm, nowhere near as warm as Toronto had been, but Fort Smith was surrounded by forests. Any spare time she could, she spent in the forests, exploring the great woods, watching the animals, looking for interesting things.

It was a sunny day in early spring when she happened upon the burrow. It had been dug into a gentle hill, so the cave sloped sharply downward. Truthfully, she fell into it, her left foot firmly planted on the ground next to opening, her right foot finding only air. She landed across the opening, bruising her shoulder in the fall.

Once she brushed herself off, rubbing her shoulder, she peered deep into the cave. The sun didn’t penetrate very far, but the longer she stared, the brighter the burrow seemed to get. Eventually, she noticed a faint blue light emanating from somewhere far into the cave. In the glow, the burrow became a cavern, larger than her room at home. It was the blue glow that made her crawl into the burrow, and leave the world behind her.

I seem to have neglected the paragraph that explains her affinity to sports (Hockey and Rugby specifically, she’s a tough, strong girl), opposite her father’s scholarly pursuits (which explains her hockey stick, and her skill at wielding it in the future).

Spoiler alert: When she returns from the cave, the world seems faded, desaturated. She seems invisible to the normal world, but very visible to the new array of animals and monsters that find her. A helpful denizen calls it “in-between”, we might call it “a parallel universe”, 90 degrees from the reality we know. They bleed together, though nobody in the “real” world notices.

Someone has to steal that keepsake necklace. She also has to save somebody and be a hero. She makes some lifelong friends. The whole spiel.

She seems like she’d have a dog too, a white husky. Or maybe she meets a bear in-between. Or an Alaska Marmot (something unique would be nice, though it exists nowhere near Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, Canada). I like the idea of a marmot, ferret, or mongoose, the long, elegant rodents. He would be a stark contrast to her stoicism, full of energy and vibrance (almost to the point of ADD).

It might be her mother disappeared to in-between (or maybe just her spirit). There’s also a Reaper, a thin wisp of blackness 12 feet tall, but Death in the neutral sense, not in the evil sense. He never speaks, though she might talk at him, even scream at him, blame him for her mother (think No-Face, but without animosity or antagonism).

I would avoid the standard “she finds her femininity” or “turns into a princess” tropes because really. I mean really. Gag me with a Volkswagen. I hate the “princess” trope most of all. As far as I can tell, the only true reward because of her journey will be confidence, companionship, some closure for her mother, and maybe a battle scar or two. A real-life happy ending if ever there was one, in contrast to the fantasy world her story takes place in.

Video game or short story, whatever. I think it’d be awesome to watch her wielding her hockey stick to bludgeon enemies, and her marmot darting from enemy to enemy in a blur of motion.

Ah… the stories that art can evoke.

(Reblogged from thefusspot)
(Reblogged from pockmarkedmoon)